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I think someone I know is being bullied or harassed
 
If you think someone you know is being bullied or harassed there are lots of ways in which you can help them. 
 
Understanding the behaviours associated with bullying and harassment is a good place to start. Most people will be able to describe what has or is happening to them and how it's making them feel. 
 
Bullying is offensive, intimidating, malicious or insulting behaviour, an abuse or misuse of power to undermine, humiliate, denigrate or injure the recipient. The behaviour or treatment may relate to a person’s gender, disability, gender re-assignment or gender identity, race, religion, sexual orientation, age or any other protected characteristic. 
 
Harassment is behaviour which is unwanted and which violates a person’s dignity or creates an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment. The views of the person who is being subjected to the unwanted behaviour are important when considering whether something constitutes harassment. 
 
Further details on what bullying and harassment mean are set out in our ‘What are bullying and harassment?’ support article
 
Think 
 
Are they in immediate danger? If they are in immediate danger or seriously injured, you can call 999 (or 112 from a mobile). 
 
Find a safe space.  If an incident has just happened try and find somewhere they feel safe. If this isn't possible and they are scared or fearful you can call Security on 0121 331 6969 when on campus. 
 
Listen 
 
Just taking the time to listen to someone and talk about what has happened can help. These six active listening tips might help you support them. 
 
Give options 
 
When they have finished talking ask them if they are okay to talk through some possible options and next steps. 

 
Report 
 
Report and Support. Students and staff can report an incident using the University’s Report and Support system. You can choose to do this anonymously or you can request support from an advisor. If you choose to talk to an advisor they will be able to talk through the options and support available to you, in confidence. You can report an incident no matter where it took place. 
 
Student Governance (students) or HR (staff members). If you choose to make a formal complaint to the University about a student or member of staff there are procedures which set out the steps you'll need to follow. 
 
Get Support 
 
  • Staff members can contact the BCU Employee Assistance Programme 
  • Students can contact the Mental Health & Wellbeing team. Support is available to all students from wellbeing advisors, mental health advisors and counsellors. 
  • Call theSamaritans Helpline on 116 123 (open 24/7, 365 days a year) 
  • Togetherall is a free online support service that can be accessed using your university email address. There are self-help resources and courses, along with 24/7 access to peer and professional support. 
  • Take care of yourself. It’s important that you take care of yourself. If you’ve heard something distressing or if something is troubling you, seek help and support from one of the above services. 
  • Look at the NHS guidance on 5 steps to positive mental wellbeing
  • Access some self-help resources available on iCity. 

If you are worried or concerned about someone else’s mental health, find out more about how you can help them
 
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